Eland Herd Pauses

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Now and again one is blessed with sighting of a herd of Eland (Tragelaphus oryx) in the Mana Pools areas. This herd seems to be predominantly male, but sometimes one encounters large nursery herds. The Eland is not a fast moving beast, basically being able to maintain a trot rate over several kilometers of about 35 kph, but rarely does so. Eland have the bulk of a domestic cow (and in fact were bred in captivity for their meat in Zimbabwe at one time). They are generally slower than other plains antelope, which might suggest this makes them a favourite for predators, but like the Kudu, the Eland is an incredibly high jumper. An Eland’s defense against predators is not in flight, but engagement, sometimes by mobbing and chasing off the predator.
Population Trend : Stable; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/3000 sec; f/5.6; ISO 640; 371mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Photography Terms
Absolute Resolution is the horizontal and vertical pixel count of a camera’s sensor express as a multiplication of the two parameters usually expressed in megapixels.

“And young people who are learning digital skills discover that the real challenge is coming up with an image that resonates, first of all, with yourself and hopefully, with an audience. They can learn all these new techniques and think that they’re easier to use, but creating great images isn’t about the tools.”

– Jerry Uelsmann

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Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Browsing Kigelia

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A buffalo (Syncerus caffer) herd moving to water pauses for a short while to browse on the flowers of the Sausage Tree (Kigelia africana), a favourite at this time of the year (October).
Population Trend : Decreasing; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/500 sec; f/5.6; ISO 640; 200mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

The World of Lenses
Wide Angle Lenses are those lens which range between 21 and 35mm and is used in compositions which need more of the scene to be included in the photograph. Wide Angle lenses have an important role in landscape and architectural photography, making full use of their wider field of view, and is a favourite of the crime scene photographer and interior design imaging. The wide the lens the greater the tendency of the lens to magnify the distance between objects and introduce perspective distortion.

“Contradictions of perspective. Contrasts of light. Contrasts of form. Points of view impossible to achieve in drawing and painting. Foreshortenings with a strong distortion of the objects, with a crude handling of matter. Moments altogether new, never seen before… compositions whose boldness outstrips the imagination of painters… Then the creation of those instants which do not exist, contrived by means of photomontage. The negative transmits altogether new stimuli to the sentient mind and eye.”

– Alexander Rodchenko

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Grazing Kigelia Flowers

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A favourite delicacy of most southern African antelope, a lot of primates and elephants too, are the beautiful flowers of the sausage tree (Kigelia africana) which occurs throughout tropical Africa. Here a Kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) grazes on the flowers which have fallen from the tree. Often there is a symbiotic relationship between primates shaking branches and dislodging flowers in the tree and the animals which graze these flowers off the ground.
Population Trend : Stable; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM +1.4x III; 1/500 sec; f/4.5; ISO 640; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

The World of Lenses
Zoom Lenses, sometimes known as parfocal lenses where they retain focus through the focal range, are probably the most popularly used lenses, being especially prevalent among wildlife photographers. These lenses allow the user to adjust the focal length on the subject, while the image remains in focus (a zoom lens which loses focus during change to the focal length is varifocal). Zoom lenses suffer a loss of image resolution at maximum aperture, mainly at the extremes of their focal ranges.

“Here’s how you can tell if your ‘zoom’ is actually a varifocal. Zoom to maximum focal length and focus on an object manually about 10 feet away. Now zoom back to the shortest focal length. If the viewfinder is still sharp, you have a true zoom. If it’s hopelessly out of focus, it’s a varifocal.”

– Herbert Keppler

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Taking a Break

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Male Lion (Panthera leo) takes a break in the shade after gorging on a buffalo killed earlier in the day. There appeared to be two dominant males in the pride. Estes (Richard – The Behaviour Guide to African Mammals) suggests the degree of male competition in the species has lead to social behaviour in prides not too dissimilar to baboons. Male size and showier mane development have, in some cases, impaired hunting ability in males.
Population Trend : Decreasing; Threat: VulnerableSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM +1.4x III; 1/250 sec; f/6.7; ISO 500; 264mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

The World of Lenses
Tilt Shift Lenses are mostly used in architectural photography and allow the photographer to adjust the composition of an image without tilting the camera. Some refer to these lenses as ‘perspective control’ lenses. Camera tilt induces skewed vertical lines in buildings and tall structures. By tilting the lens (thus making the focal plane pliable) converging verticals and indeed perspective may be reduced or adjusted. Tilt shift lenses are by their nature wide angle. There has been a surge of interest in perspective manipulation photography.

“A photographer’s eye is perpetually evaluating. A photographer can bring coincidence of line simply by moving his head a fraction of a millimeter. He can modify perspectives by a slight bending of the knees. By placing the camera closer to or farther from the subject, he draws a detail. But he composes a picture in very nearly the same amount of time it takes to click the shutter, at the speed of a reflex action.”

– Henri Cartier-Bresson

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Buffalo Herd

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The early morning movement of a Buffalo (Syncerus caffer) herd is captured from the apparent safety of a fallen tree, but the sentinel beast was very much aware of the photographer’s presence. This herd appears to be moving slowly from water, which they usually take at least once in 24 hours.
Population Trend : Decreasing; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM +1.4x III; 1/500 sec; f/5.6; ISO 640; 170mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

The World of Lenses
Standard Lenses are fixed focal range lenses which fall typically in the range between 35mm and 70mm, usually with a wide aperture, and are commonly referred to as natural lenses. Theses lenses have an angle of view similar to the human eye, and the images they produce are said to be natural. Henri Cartier-Bresson, realising this, did most of his work with a 50mm lens. Fixed focal length lenses are the favourite of street photographers, landscapers and portrait snappers, and their use is often telling of a photographer’s capability.

“I decided to get into wildlife photography. In many ways it’s harder than other forms of picture taking, but when you finally get that shot you’ve been trying for, it’s a wonderful and rewarding feeling. ”

– David Young

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…