Alerted Lioness

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This lioness (Panthera leo) was probably on a hunting mission with one other lioness when encountered by the photographer; and if looks could kill. They were watching over an open vlei from the shade of a tree, supposedly awaiting unsuspecting prey to cross their ambush area. A fit lion can gather speed up to 60-70 kilometres per hour in the chase, but can only maintain this for about 100m. With common antelope, like Impala, being able to achieve 80-90 kph during flight, the lion really needs an element of surprise and for its prey to encroach within 30m. Humans have no chance. The world’s fastest, Usain Bolt, reaches a mere 45 kph over 100m!
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/250 sec; f/11; ISO 320; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

A-Z of Photography
F/Stop is the setting which regulates the aperture of a camera, modifying the amount of light falling on the sensor, and the depth of field (area of focus) in an image. The f-number series is a geometric series based on a multiplication of the factor 1.4. Each f/stop change results in a doubling or halving of the light transmitted through the lens.

“After forty years of ingesting every aspect of photographic science and composition, I still find the camera to be an endlessly intriguing partner that challenges my imagination and knowledge. All that with only three variables of shutter speed, aperture and focal length.”

– Ralph Auletta

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Big Mouth

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A river horse (Hippopotamus amphibious) yawns while catching the last shards of light at Long Pool. During the early evening these beasts will stir and begin thinking about food, and the long trek to their favourite grazing spots. They travel up to 10 kilometres from water to feed and will consume as much as 70 kg in a night. This hippo is not actually yawning, it is threatening imposters taking its picture.
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/500 sec; f/5.6; ISO 320; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

A-Z of Photography
Golden Ratio is based on a natural phenomenon and exploited by ancient fine artists to achieve a more aesthetically pleasing composition of their works. The mathematician, Leonardo Bonacci introduced the Fibonacci sequence from which any two successive numbers in the sequence form a constant ratio, or the Golden Ratio which approximates to 1.618 or in basic terms a 5 x 8. The spiral created by squares measured in the decreasing Fibonacci sequence may be found in many aspects of nature, giving rise to the term divine ratio..

“I wanted to combine science and photography in a sensible, unemotional way. Some people’s ideas of scientific photography is just arty design, something pretty. That was not the idea. The idea was to interpret science sensibly, with good proportion, good balance and good lighting, so we could understand it.”

– Berenice Abbott

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Elephant and Impala at Sunset

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Mana Pools at sunset experiences the most extraordinary change in light and photo opportunity, but the window is often small. Frequently, this is a time when one just lowers the camera, observes, and enjoys.
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/350 sec; f/5.6; ISO 1000; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

A-Z of Photography
Hyperfocal Distance is the distance of the nearest object in a composition that is acceptably sharp when the lens is focused on infinity (or the distance). Focusing on objects at the hyperfocal distance ensures sharpness of the image from half way between the photographer and the hyperfocal point into infinity. As the aperture of the camera is closed or tightened (i.e. increasing the f/stop) the hyperfocal distance is reduced.

“A landscape image cuts across all political and national boundaries, it transcends the constraints of language and culture”

– Charlie Waite

African Skimmers

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A recent sighting of the near-threatened African Skimmers (Rynchops flavirostris) at Mana Pools was caused a little excitement for a few who attempted to capture on camera formations of up to three birds skimming across pans, with their mandibles dipped in the water, looking for prey. They feed mostly at dawn and dusk, giving photographers a few setting challenges. Skimmers are intra-African migrants moving into Southern Africa (mostly along the Zambezi and Caprivi Strip/northern Botswana) during the dry season.
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/350 sec; f/5.6; ISO 3200; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

A-Z of Photography

Image Stabilisation or Vibration Reduction, usually built into camera lenses (and some binoculars too) minimises the effect of camera shake, especially at slow shutter speeds. This is achieved by deploying fine sensors to detect camera motion and adjusting for this through movement of either lens or sensor (known as optical IS). Digital IS uses software to achieve the same result.

“A shutter working at a speed of one-fourth to one-twenty-fifth of a second will answer all purposes. A little blur in a moving subject will often aid to giving the impression of action and motion”

– Alfred Stieglitz

Waterbuck Basking in the Morning

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The Waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus), with its distinctive white hoop on its rump, is a hardy antelope which is fairly well distributed in East and Central Africa. It is the most water reliant of the antelope and less able to withstand dehydration in extremely hot conditions. Its habitat will usually extend to grazing land near water. While mostly a grazer, it will browse on available herbage, particular during the dry season when grasses may be in short supply.
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/180 sec; f/5.6; ISO 320; 349mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

A-Z of Photography
Kelvin Scale is a measurement of the visible light spectrum and is usually described as colour temperature as applied to different emission sources. Photographic “normal daylight” may be expressed in kelvins (K) and is usually gauged at about 5,500K, while tungsten light may emit at lower temperatures. Colour temperature during the “golden hour” is around 3,500K and is certainly considered by many the best time for wildlife photography.

“I expect to retire to a fine-grained heaven where the temperatures are always consistent, where the images slide before ones eyes in a continual cascade of form and meaning.”

– Ansel Adams