Good Morning!

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A young Hyena (Crocuta crocuta) pops its head above the parapet. There is no telling the difference between male and female in this species, which is perhaps famous for its ‘hermaphroditism’. This, some believe, is an outcome of female dominance and aggressiveness in the competition to secure food for their young. It is said that females actually outpace males in testosterone production and grow larger and are more aggressive than males. The male looking external genitalia of females is unique in this species.
Population Trend : Decreasing; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/3000 sec; f/5.6; ISO 3200; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Photography Terms
F-stop, is a lens aperture setting measure which all variable aperture lens are calibrated. The measure provides an indication to the users of the amount of light being transmitted through the lens. Each stop change either halves of doubles the amount of light on the film or sensor. The f-stop setting also determines the depth of field on the subjected in the image.

“When I first started learning how to take photographs, you had to spend the first six months figuring out what an f-stop was. Now you just go and take pictures. Nobody thinks about technical issues anymore because cameras or camera phones take care of that automatically. ”

– Martin Parr

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

The Godfather

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The adult baboon (Papio cynocephalus) in this image is not necessarily the father, but may well be a ‘godfather’ who has been associated with the mother of the youngster in some way. The loving hug by this male demonstrates a trait among baboon troops of godfathering which includes holding, grooming and food sharing. This is a very unique social bonding and normally lasts for near on two years, when the juvenile becomes more independent of its maternal ties. Godfathering baboons are known to foster the orphaned young.
Population Trend : Stable; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/350 sec; f/5.6; ISO 640; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Photography Terms
Exposure latitude is the extent to which any light-sensitive material can tolerate under or over exposure and still produce an acceptable image. This is put to use by the photographer in such a way as to give aesthetic and artistic value to an image, but is purely subjective. Media has some impact on exposure latitude, black and white film, for example, is far less tolerant than say colour film. This measure should not be confused with dynamic range, which is the cameras ability to ‘see’ from the darkest shadow to the brightest highlight.

“A snapshot steals life that it cannot return. A long exposure creates a form that never existed.”

– Dieter Appelt

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Simian Jockey

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You just have to love baboons (Papio Cynocephalus), they are often the source of great entertainment in the bush. Here a commonly adopted form of transportation of the young, which any jockey would be proud to achieve! Small baboons gain locomotion skills after about a month after birth, including climbing. By 6-12 weeks they are able to ride on the backs of adults ‘jockey’ style. At speed, amazingly, they can stay mounted.
Population Trend : Stable; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/2000 sec; f/5.6; ISO 640; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Photography Terms
Diopter adjustments come with most high end cameras and allow camera users to calibrate the view finder to match their eyesight. The same calibration may be found on microscopes. A diopter is a unit of measure, which may be associated with close-up lens to indicate magnification, but more commonly it is the adjustment to the view finder. This adjustment allows the user to view the image in the viewfinder without the use of glasses.

“The geography of a person’s face can be very interesting, but a close-up will not tell us who the person is, how they think or live, or the situation they’re in”

– Peter Adams

Tree Elephant

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The texture on the rump of a bull elephant (Loxodonta africana) almost blends in with the tree trunk. That skin is very tough and about 2.5cm deep on the rump and back of the beast. Nevertheless, its skin is a very sensitive system and some say the elephant can detect small insects and the delicate probing, with their trunks, of others in the herd.
Population Trend : Increasing; Threat: VulnerableSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/250 sec; f/6.7; ISO 1600; 255mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Photography Terms
Center-weighted Mode is an automatic exposure estimate in which reflected light measured on or about the center of the viewing frame sets the general exposure of the image as a whole. Center metering is often a default setting on DSLR cameras, and especially point and shoot cameras.

“A photograph is not an accident, it is a concept. It exists at, or before, the moment of exposure of the negative”

– Ansel Adams

Boswell Rising

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The majestic elephant (Loxodonta africana) they call Boswell, an iconic beast, and one of the few elephants in the area, in which he was photographed, that rises up on its hind quarters to feed from the higher branches of trees. This time ‘our Boswell’ is caught with a glimpse of morning light on his belly.  A personal favourite!
Population Trend : Increasing; Threat: VulnerableSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/3000 sec; f/6.7; ISO 1600; 1001mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Photography Terms
Bicubic Interpolation comes about during the studio process and is generally associated with the enlargement of a digital image which involves the insertion of new pixels that, in case of bicubic interpolation, calculate their attributes from the nearest surrounding eight pixels. This method of enlargement creates more contrast thus setting off the effect of blurring which may occur with the process. Photo processing software usually provides a choice between bicubic and bilinear interpolation.

“When 35mm was in full flower in this country; in the miniature’s golden thirties – photographers in the new medium became ‘experts’ overnight, full of tall talk about small grain and big enlargements. They had to, in self-defence, for in those early days of the miniature it seemed important to be technically hep, at least in conversation. Never mind the pictures! In spite of much hokum, much good came to the surface, survived the babel and exerted an influence that has since benefitted all photography.”

– Jacob Deschin