Basking Squirrel

 

Squirrel Basking_2018_07_26_1640
This little arboreal rodent was a touch upset that we had interfered with its sun-basking activity. Tree squirrels are usually very photogenic creatures, but they hardly seem to catch the attention of photographers.
(Canon EOS 5D MarkIII / EF 100-400mm f/4.5 L IS II USM +1.4x III; 1/250 sec; f/8.0; ISO 640; 560mm)

Picture ©2018 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

 

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.

Contemplation

Baboon Contemplation_2011_10_24_2637

 

Chacma baboon (Papio cynocephalus ursinus) contemplates life at the side of a pool. Baboons are probably the most common species, aside from the impala antelope, in the majority of parks in southern Africa. In fact baboons tend to follow the more populous impala, often feeding off their droppings, and are known to kill (not very efficiently) and eat juvenile impala when opportunity presents itself. Socially, baboons are not unlike politicians, operating in an oligarchic community where males groom and pander more dominant females to garner support for elevation in the troop, almost to the extent of pair-bonding. Females in oestrus tend towards being promiscuous, allowing sub-adults and sometimes even juveniles to mount them and, apparently, older males are a little more discerning about with whom they copulate.
(Canon 7D; f/5,6; 1/50sec; ISO-320; 400mm)

Picture ©2011 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Mongoose Party

Mongoose Party_2018_07_26_0865

The banded mongoose pack presented itself in a dry river bed and crossed the sand in single file, ever conscious of any threat to them with a sentinel member stretching up on hind legs to observe before making the crossing. These diurnal and highly gregarious creatures may form packs of up to 30 animals and use scent marking, social grooming and vocalisation for group cohesion. Always difficult to get close enough to them for a really great impact photograph.
(Canon EOS 5D MarkIII / EF 100-400mm f/4.5 L IS II USM; 1/2000 sec; f/8.0; ISO 320; 560mm)

Picture ©2018 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.

Lions Feasting

Tucking in_2011_09_11_2354
A pride of nine lions (Panthera leo) took down this buffalo in this cruel spat of survival in the wild. Within minutes the entire pride was gorging itself on its quarry, a feast which continued into the night.  A wide angle lens would have been far more appropriate.  One of those occasions when there was just too much lens.
(Canon 50D / EF 100-400mm f/4.5 L IS II USM; f/5; 1/60sec; ISO-800; 200mm)

Picture ©2011 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Stretching in the Larder

Reaching Elephant_2018_07_25_1054

A bull elephant honing its food collection skills, which is a common sight in Mana Pools. That tree, Acacia Galpinii (also known as Monkey Thorn), which grows in riverine woodlands, is a favourite for pachyderms in the park. Those apparently sweet leaves will be bursting out in abundance during the spring, the tree will flower and six months later the pods will fall, another favourite delicacy of the elephant. This particular elephant actually lifts itself onto its hind legs and stretches higher into the tree for food. His skills are renowned, not only to photographers, but to the many other elephants which follow him on his feeding route.
(Canon EOS 5D MarkIII / EF 100-400mm f/4.5 L IS II USM; 1/2000 sec; f/5.6; ISO 1250; 170mm)

Picture ©2018 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

 

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.