Defending his Range

Hostile_2015_08_22_9526This male lion (Panthera leo) was a little more defensive than normal, having recently ventured into new hunting range, being the domain of other males in the area. The lions in Mana Pools exist within ranges of approximately 30-50km2. Nothing ventured, nothing gained, and he certainly was not taking any chances with photographers on the day, aggressively standing his ground and basically dominating the confrontation. Prudence dictated a tactical withdrawal despite being a ‘safe’ distance from the pride. Those ladies did look hungry.
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/640 sec; f/7.1; ISO 320; 300mm)

Picture ©2015 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

A-Z of Photography
Noise is the generally grainy look found in digital images which sometimes manifests itself as spots of colour which should not be in the image, usually the result of low light photography using very high ISO settings. Noise seldom enhances a photograph and in some cameras noise reduction technology may be used to reduce this problem. Later model digital cameras seem to work well at higher ISO settings, with inbuilt noise elimination.

“I expect to retire to a fine-grained heaven where the temperatures are always consistent, where the images slide before one’s eyes in a continual cascade of form and meaning.”

– Ansel Adams

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Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Baby Waterbuck

Young Waterbuck_2015_08_23_8885

This rather donkey like, young Waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus) seems to be detached from the herd, bathing in the last warm rays of sunshine during the late afternoon. This species is very common in Mana Pools and confines its territory to near water remaining within about 2km of principle water features. The animal often seeks refuge in water when chased by predators. Common myth is that predators avoid the Waterbuck because it secretes a foul smelling, oily substance into its coat, but the antelope is still hunted and eaten by carnivores.
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/640 sec; f/5.6; ISO 320; 400mm)

Picture ©2015 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

A-Z of Photography
An Objective, in the photography context, is an optical system containing a combination of lenses that receive and direct light to form an image on a focal plane, and usually comprises optical glass, being of a high quality and colour-free with specific refractive qualities.

“Photographers have for a long time been gazing with hypnotic absorption at this mechanical-optical marvel, the camera. Let them lift their eyes and consider that which is in front of the camera. There awaits the model – Mona Lisa in the person of Mary Jones. What are they going to do with her? It would be well if photographers could forget for a while the expensive camera and it’s marvellous insides and the impressive array of chemicals in the closet under the stairs, and concentrate solely and definitely on the model. For it is through the model – whether it be a goat or a duchess – that life is made to stir in the dead substance of the picture.”

– William Mortensen 1937

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Face to Face

Face to Face_2015_08_17_0165

Bull elephants (Loxodonta africana) can be quite curious creatures. This face to face was typical of an encounter between man and beast where the latter has established some trust in humanity. These clever animals actually like to test one’s mettle in a seeming game of dare. You would not survive this encounter with a female elephant. The photographer was seated quietly in bramble with his back to a termite mound, hoping the bull would simply walk on by. It did eventually, but not before a thorough face to face inspection, with its trunk, of the wide eyed intruders.
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/160 sec; f/6.3; ISO 640; 100mm)

Picture ©2015 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

A-Z of Photography
Polarising filters only allow light vibrating in a single plane to pass through the filter and are used to eliminate reflections (which emit multi-directional light vibrations) and to deepen blue skies. The filter absorbs light vibrations outside the single plane. Most polarising filters allow a circular movement of the filter piece to enable maximum effect on cameras. Linear polarising filters tend to confuse most digital cameras with autofocus and metering systems.

“I am always surprised when I see several cameras, a gaggle on lenses, filters, meters, et cetera, rattling around in a soft bag with a complement of refuse and dust. Sometimes the professional is the worst offender! ”

– Ansel Adams

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Good Morning Africa

Good Morning Africa_2015_08_17_0149

This is contre jour in Africa, a genre in photography involving the back lighting of a subject. The early morning is a special time to absorb the warmth of the African sun and to take photographs of our fur clad friends, the baboons (Papio cynocephalus), enjoying that warmth. Here, a troop is sitting absorbing the first rays, pondering the new day and basking in the warmth. No newspapers, no mobile phones, and no rush hour traffic here!
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF70-200mm IS II USM; 1/1500 sec; f/6.3; ISO 640; 400mm)

Picture ©2015 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography 🐾

A-Z of Photography
Quasi-fish-eye-lenses (sometimes called full framed fish-eye) are lens which produce an image on either film or sensor the covers the entire area of the frame. A true fish-eye-lens will normally produce a circular (or hemispherical) image covering and ultra-wide angle of view (180º – 8mm).

“A very fine photographer asked me, ‘What did it feel like the first time you manipulated an image?’, and I said ‘Do you mean the first time I shot black and white instead of colour, do you mean the first time I burned the corner of a print down, do you mean the first time I spotted a dust speck on my print, do you mean the first time I shot with a wide angle instead of a normal lens, I mean what are you referring to? Where does it stop?'”

– Dan Burkholder

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Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Pushing and Shoving

Push and Shove_2015_08_17_0105

During August, the Sausage Trees (Kigelia africana) are in bloom. Its dark maroon flowers are somewhat of a delicacy among some of the animals of Mana Pools, especially the elephants (Loxondonta africana). This bull elephant was pushing and shoving the tree in the hope that some of the delicate blooms would drop to the ground.
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF70-200mm IS II USM; 1/125 sec; f/5; ISO 640; 148mm)

Picture ©2015 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

A-Z of Photography
Reciprocity is the relationship between a camera’s aperture and shutter speed. A correct exposure is achieved through a balance of the camera’s current aperture and the shutter speed at which shooting takes place. The process is automatic on most modern digital cameras and one setting will self-adjust to the changes made to the other. As shutter speed is increased, by manual adjustment, the aperture may be tightened or reduced and vice versa. Reciprocity failure was more a feature of photographs taken with film, but this translates to pixelation and noise in digital media. This give rise to the term ‘reciprocity law’ which means that different combinations of shutter speed and aperture can achieve the same exposure result. This allows for creative use of the camera in different environments.

“Grains and reciprocity failure in film = Noise and pixelate in digital”

– Lakshman Iyer

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…