Poisonous Food

Euphobia_2015_05_18_8245

The tip of a branch of the Lesser candelabra tree (Euphorbia cooperi) or its variant calidicola just coming into bloom. This plant occurs throughout the Zambezi Valley in wooded areas, in fact calidicola is exclusive to the Valley. It’s a toxic plant (containing rotonin), with a milky latex that is both pungent and acrid to the smell, causing serious irritation to skin exposed to the latex and even a burning sensation from its fumes if inhaled. The latex may cause blindness. The substance is known to have been used for fishing (it denies the fish oxygen and causes paralysis). Yet, it is on record that the candelabra tree is a favourite of the rhinoceros, which once roamed the Zambezi Valley, but since decimated by poaching. In more arid regions of Namibia the Euphobia is a staple for the rhino’s survival.
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM + 1.4x III; 1/320 sec; f/8; ISO 640; 400mm)

Picture ©2015 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

A-Z of Photography
Vignetting may be entire intentional (in fact some may use vignetting filters in their compositions) or unintended underexposure on the corners and edges of an image. An unwanted vignetting is usually caused by an inappropriate lens hood or object which partially blocks the field of view. This was a technique used during printing to achieve a full exposure of the central area of the image with fading or darkening edges, and was at one time common with portrait work. The term is derived from the French vignete (diminutive of vigne or vine).

“But also to me, the Holga, the way these images are, that they are sharp in the centre and they vignette in the corners is more how we really see. When you’re looking at the world, you’re not seeing a scene that is sharp all the way to the edges and bright all the way to the edges and has straight lines. You’re seeing something sharp in the centre and then the rest of it is all kind of blurring out.”

– Michelle Bates

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

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Red-billed Hornbill

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The Southern Red-billed Hornbill (Tockus rufirostirus) is such a commonly seen little bird, that few stop to take notice of it.  They are abundant in the Zambezi Valley.  It is a touch skittish, habitually taking flight if disturbed, so one doesn’t get close. This species frequents open savanna and woodland areas, with sparse ground cover and enjoys the Mopani woodland endemic to some Lowveld terrains. The Hornbills enjoy a varied diet including beetles, termites and larvae, and will even take vertebrates, including other small birds, especially nesting chicks. They will consume fruit and seed too, and are usually found foraging on the ground. In the Zambezi Valley the Southern Red-billed Hornbill is known to flock and migrate regionally. There is an unusual occurrence of some 1,000 birds having drowned in Lake Kariba reported on one occasion during such a migration.
(Canon EOS 5D Mark III / EF100-400mm IS II USM +1.4x III; 1/500 sec; f/8; ISO 320; 560mm)

Picture ©2015 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Photography Quotes

The Amercian photographer and environmentalist, Ansel Adams, is perhaps one of the most well know black and white landscape photographers, whose fine art work in the Yosemite National Park is well famed. Adams became a guiding light in the field of photography, writing extensively on the subject and teaching with emphasis on resolution, clarity and sharpness, which perhaps explains his founding of the Group f/64. He was a great lover of large format photography. Ansel Adams is attributed with this quotation:

“In some photographs, the essence of light and space dominate; in others, the substance of rock and wood, and the luminous insistence of growing things…It is my intention to present – through the medium of photography – intuitive observations of the natural world which may have meaning to spectators.”

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Zambezi Valley Highway

Zambesi Highway_2011_10_22_2922

A huge baobab tree (Adansonia digitata) sits on the side of the track, along a rough route through the Mana Pools National Park. From this point, the author walked into a water pan, one of the few not dried up at this time of the year before the first rains, about 3kms from the road to seek photo opportunities during the cooler part of the morning – circa 35°C. The return trip in the middle of the day was probably in the 40°s This image is so typical of the terrain and dry flora of the Zambezi Valley shortly before the first rains. That baobab tree produces a large egg shaped seed pod, much sought after for its contents, a powder which is known as cream of tartar, giving rise to the alternate name, tartar tree
(Canon 7D; f/11; 1/60sec; ISO-200; 100mm)

Picture ©2011 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography