Mother and Child

Mother and Child_2016_10_14_2802

Elephant (Loxodonta africana) mothers develop a protective bond with their offspring so much so that if a calf wanders off, the cow will go after it and bring it to within her “safety net”. Slowly this bond changes to a leader/follower relationship with the burden of staying close to mother being on the calf.  This maternal bond lasts for many years beyond weaning.  One of Africa’s beautiful beasts and one still cannot understand how humanity has allowed its outright slaughter in Africa. Ivory Poaching and hunting has decimated half of Mozambique’s elephant population in 5 years (by 2015) and yet further by 2017 leaving a mere 5% of these magnificent mammals in the wild.
Population Trend : Increasing; Threat: VulnerableSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mark III/ EF100-400 IS USM; 1/750 sec; f/6.7; ISO 640; 227mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Photography Terms
Bit Depth in digital photography refers to the number of bits to record the colour of a single pixel. Colour is represented in three channels, red, green and blue with at least eight bits per colour channel, giving a bit depth of 24 bits per pixel and a colour range of over 16 million hues, tints and shades.

“Be daring, be different, be impractical, be anything that will assert integrity of purpose and imaginative vision against the ‘play-it-safers’, the creatures of the commonplace, the slaves of the ordinary.”

– Peter Lindberg

 

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

 

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Elephant in Weed Filled Pool

Elephant in Hyacinth_2011_10_21_2806
An elephant (Loxodonta africana) feeds on the roots of an aquatic weed, water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) at one of the few surviving water pans at Mana Pools National Park. The general shortage of food in the area, shortly before the rains, makes water hyacinth a useful plant for the duration. Hyacinth is indigenous to South America, originating from the upper Amazon basin. It is one of the worst aquatic weeds to infest southern African water ways, out –competing indigenous aquatic plant species and causing oxygen starvation to fish and other aquatic creatures. Attempts at cleaning up this pest plant using biological controls, in the form of weevils, have partly eradicated the scourge, but its presence is still felt in most dams and still waters.
Population Trend : Increasing; Threat: VulnerableSource IUCN
(Canon 7D; f/11; 1/60sec; ISO-200; 100mm)

Picture ©2011 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Baboons Watering

Baboon Troop_2016_10_14_2835

Baboons (Papio cynocephalus) are always a treat to watch, because in some respects they reflect many of our characteristics and social behaviours. Here a small troop has arrived at a waterhole and settling in to drink.
Population Trend : Stable; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mark III/ EF100-400 IS USM; 1/125 sec; f/10; ISO 360; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Photography Terms
Angle of view is a measurement of how much the lens can see, usually measured in degrees. The longer the focal length of the lens, the narrower the angle of view. Typically this ranges from a fish eye lens, being at most 180 degrees, to say a 400mm lens at just 6 degrees. A zoom lens has an adjustable angle of view.

“I am not very interested in extraordinary angles. They can be effective on certain occasions, but I do not feel the necessity for them in my own work. Indeed, I feel the simplest approach can often be most effective. A subject placed squarely in the centre of the frame, if attention is not distracted from it by fussy surroundings, has a simple dignity which makes it all the more impressive.”

– Bill Brandt

 

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Kudu on Termite Mound

Kudu on Anthill_2016_10_15_3267A Kudu antelope cow (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) standing atop an termite mound is quite a common observation in Mana Pools. There is little reference as to why this antelope is attracted to these raised elevations and one can only guess this is either anti-predatory or the mount is a source of minerals and salts.
Population Trend : Stable; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mark III/ EF100-400 IS USM; 1/350 sec; f/5.6; ISO 1000; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Photography Terms
White Balance is sets the colour temperature of the scene being taken so that it takes on a normal appearance to the human eye. White balance can be adjusted to warm and cool images, and is often done post-shooting with editing software. Colour temperature is expressed in Kelvins

“Black and white can show how something is. Colour adds how it is, imbued with temperatures and humidities of experience.”

– Peter Schjeldahl

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

 

Egyptian Geese

Egyption Geese_2012_05_21_3978

A pair of Egyptian geese (Alopochen aegyptiacus) perch on a log next to a water pan during the breeding season. They are, apparently, monogamous for life. These birds are distinguished by a brown mask about their eyes and a brown chest patch marking. They can be found across most of southern Africa, even at the remotest freshwater pans. The male tends towards being aggressive during the mating season and offers a grunting honk to intruders.
(Canon 7D; f/6.3; 1/200sec; ISO-100; 400mm)

Picture ©2012 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography