Buffalo Morning

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Buffalo (Syncerus caffer) enjoying a few Kigalia flowers while basking in the early morning sun. This small group was part of a much larger herd moving to water in the early morning. Like their domestic ‘cousins’, buffalo use a series of distinctive vocal calls to initiate herd activity, while in transit, threatened or drinking and grazing.

Population Trend : Stable; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mark III/ EF100-400 IS USM; 1/2000 sec; f/4.5; ISO 4000; 225mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Photography Terms
Panning is the horizontal movement of the camera, following a moving object that is kept in a constant position in the viewfinder, while taking an image, intended to give a strong sense of speed or movement.

“Only a fraction of the camera’s possibilities interests me – the marvellous mixture of emotion and geometry, together in a single instant.”

– Henri Cartier-Bresson

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Taking a Break

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Male Lion (Panthera leo – Shona: shumba; Ndebele: isilwane) takes a break in the shade after gorging on a buffalo killed earlier in the day. There appeared to be two dominant males in the pride. Estes (Richard – The Behaviour Guide to African Mammals) suggests the degree of male competition in the species has lead to social behaviour in prides not too dissimilar to baboons. Male size and showier mane development have, in some cases, impaired hunting ability in males.
Population Trend : Decreasing; Threat: VulnerableSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM +1.4x III; 1/250 sec; f/6.7; ISO 500; 264mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

The World of Lenses
Tilt Shift Lenses are mostly used in architectural photography and allow the photographer to adjust the composition of an image without tilting the camera. Some refer to these lenses as ‘perspective control’ lenses. Camera tilt induces skewed vertical lines in buildings and tall structures. By tilting the lens (thus making the focal plane pliable) converging verticals and indeed perspective may be reduced or adjusted. Tilt shift lenses are by their nature wide angle. There has been a surge of interest in perspective manipulation photography.

“A photographer’s eye is perpetually evaluating. A photographer can bring coincidence of line simply by moving his head a fraction of a millimeter. He can modify perspectives by a slight bending of the knees. By placing the camera closer to or farther from the subject, he draws a detail. But he composes a picture in very nearly the same amount of time it takes to click the shutter, at the speed of a reflex action.”

– Henri Cartier-Bresson

Sandpiper

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The photographer cannot make up his mind if this is a Wood Sandpiper (Tringa glareola) or Common Sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos) (perhaps its neither and he hopes you will put him right). These little carnivores and migrant birds are common to Mana Pools. They feed on small invertebrates picked from the sand and mud on the edge of shorelines and pans.
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/750 sec; f/5.6; ISO 3200; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

A-Z of Photography

Exposure Compensation is the deliberate under or over exposing of an image beyond the light metering system of the camera, usually done to achieve the correct exposure in difficult lighting situations. Many photographers will slightly underexpose their shots where the risk of clipping exists. That is where the intensity of light in an area of the image falls outside minimum or maximum intensities.

“A photographer’s eye is perpetually evaluating. A photographer can bring coincidence of line simply by moving his head a fraction of a millimetre. He can modify perspectives by a slight bending of the knees. By placing the camera closer to or farther from the subject, he draws a detail. But he composes a picture in very nearly the same amount of time it takes to click the shutter, at the speed of a reflex action.”

– Henri Cartier-Bresson

Watering Buffalo

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Buffaloes (Syncerus caffer) need to go to water at least once in every 24 hours and will consume up to 35 litres during a single drinking session of between five to seven minutes. Rarely, one might observe a buffalo wallowing in water and when you do, it will be a dominant male most likely to do so, and that will involve a lot of digging and mud tossing in the mud beside the water rather than in the water. This was a challenging capture from an exposure perspective.
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF70-200mm IS II USM + 1.4x III; 1/800 sec; f/8; ISO 400; 560mm)

Picture ©2015 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

A-Z of Photography
Shutter devices in the camera, which determine the amount of light that may fall on film or sensor in a specific instant of time are probably the single most important control in the photographer’s toolkit. Their variable speed, and association with lens aperture, offer many creative options and allow photography in several unique circumstances. Shutter speeds, ranging from fully open to 1/4,000 second in some modern cameras, regulate image output and effect. Camera shutters come in two varieties, a leaf shutter and a focal plane shutter.

“A photographer’s eye is perpetually evaluating. A photographer can bring coincidence of line simply by moving his head a fraction of a millimetre. He can modify perspectives by a slight bending of the knees. By placing the camera closer to or farther from the subject, he draws a detail. But he composes a picture in very nearly the same amount of time it takes to click the shutter, at the speed of a reflex action”

– Henri Cartier-Bresson

Angry Stare

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This male lion (Panthera leo – Shona: shumba; Ndebele: isilwane) was decidedly upset by visitors to his bush harem. There was a little bit of ‘hanky panky’ going on with a couple of ladies in the surrounding shrubbery and the photographer was clearly not welcome. This typical stare-out is just what one might expect from any self-respecting male when disturbed during courting. He is far from relaxed here. In fact this lion is in a classic defence/offence posture not quite on his haunches, ready to pounce, and head slightly lowered. Time to move back and away.
(Canon EOS 5D Mark III / EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/1000 sec; f/5.6; ISO 500; 400mm)

Picture ©2015 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Photography Quotes

Henri Cartier-Bresson is probably one of the more famous photographers of our time. He was born in France and many regard him the master of candid photography. Cartier Bresson also promoted the use of 35mm film among his fellow professionals, who were locked into medium and large format film usage. He helped develop the concept of street photography with his candid camera work, and was the leading proponent of the decisive moment. His style and work has influenced many photographers. Cartier-Bresson is credited with the following quotation:

“Reality offers us such wealth that we must cut some of it out on the spot, simplify. The question is, do we always cut out what we should? While we’re working, we must be conscious of what we’re doing. Sometimes we have the feeling that we’ve taken a great photo, and yet we continue to unfold. We must avoid however, snapping away, shooting quickly and without thought, overloading ourselves with unnecessary images that clutter our memory and diminish the clarity of the whole.”

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
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Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…