Grazing Kigelia Flowers

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A favourite delicacy of most southern African antelope, a lot of primates and elephants too, are the beautiful flowers of the sausage tree (Kigelia africana) which occurs throughout tropical Africa. Here a Kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) grazes on the flowers which have fallen from the tree. Often there is a symbiotic relationship between primates shaking branches and dislodging flowers in the tree and the animals which graze these flowers off the ground.
Population Trend : Stable; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM +1.4x III; 1/500 sec; f/4.5; ISO 640; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

The World of Lenses
Zoom Lenses, sometimes known as parfocal lenses where they retain focus through the focal range, are probably the most popularly used lenses, being especially prevalent among wildlife photographers. These lenses allow the user to adjust the focal length on the subject, while the image remains in focus (a zoom lens which loses focus during change to the focal length is varifocal). Zoom lenses suffer a loss of image resolution at maximum aperture, mainly at the extremes of their focal ranges.

“Here’s how you can tell if your ‘zoom’ is actually a varifocal. Zoom to maximum focal length and focus on an object manually about 10 feet away. Now zoom back to the shortest focal length. If the viewfinder is still sharp, you have a true zoom. If it’s hopelessly out of focus, it’s a varifocal.”

– Herbert Keppler

Simply Kudu

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There is just something about the Kudu (Tragelaphus stepsiceros) which everyone seems to warm to, especially when captured in the fine setting of the forest area in Mana Pools during the early morning light. These antelope were particularly alert to their surrounds as a pride of lions passed through the area. The kudu is a gregarious herder and non-territorial, typically comprising two to three cows with their young. They normally mate towards the end of the rains and have a gestation period of 9 months. The bulls normally shift away from cow groups during the rainy season which seems to coincide with the nursery period.
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III / EF100-400mm IS MkII USM; 1/200 sec; f/5.6; ISO 320; 400mm)

Picture ©2015 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Photography Quotes

Chelsea Roberson is an American photojournalist weaned on a “The Bison”, a publication belonging to the liberal arts university, Harding based in Searcy, Arkansas. She lives and breathes photography and is presently based in Southern California. Chelsea is attributed with this interesting quote:

“There’s no rhyme or reason to what makes a great photo. Most of the time it is pure chance and a quick shutter finger, but other times it is planning, ingenuity and sometimes even stalking”

Digger

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The Kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) seems to be lying on its head, in a mock hang-over, while the baboon walks away in disgust. The antelope is digging with its horns into the soft surround to a nearly dried pan. It is not clear whether the Kudu was digging for water, probably to avoid having to walk over the semi dried soft surface and submerging dangerously in the mud, or whether it was bringing salts to the surface. One of the agnostic behaviours of Tragelaphus is ground horning following lateral presentation by two competing male. Horns are only present in the male of the species.
(Canon EOS 7D/EF70-200mm f/2.8-5.6L IS USM +1.4x ; 1/250 sec; f/8; ISO 200; 560mm)

Picture ©2012 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Photography Quotes Ted Grant is an award winning, leading Canadian photographer and photo journalist whose career extended 60 years for Canada’s leading newspapers and magazines. He has published 8 books. He was conferred with an Honorary Doctorate of Laws Degree, by the University of Victoria, in recognition of his outstanding career.

“When you photograph people in color, you photograph their clothes. But when you photograph people in Black and white, you photograph their souls! “

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting. Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Kudu on a Termite Mound

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One of the better known and more regal antelope found in southern Africa is the Kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) standing here, so typically, on an old termite heap to gain elevation when reaching the surrounding foliage. This is not unique to Kudu: many antelope use height to better observe their surroundings. The kudu is mostly a browser, with its prehensile tongue, perhaps only seen grazing when there is fresh green grass about its domain, usually in deciduous woodland and riverine forest. Kudu are masters of crypsis, an ability to avoid observation or detection, when in thick bush. Their natural colour and camouflage tend to blend well into the thicket of Mana Pools.
(Canon EOS 7D 7/EF100-400mm IS USM; 1/90 sec; f/4.5; ISO 2500; 100mm)

Picture ©2014 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Photography Quotes
Ansel Adams was an American photographer and environmentalist. He pioneered photography in the American West and is famous for his black and white landscape photography, notably in the Yosemite National Park. He formed the f/64 club of photographers dedicated to large scale depth of field work. His images were widely published in various media including calendars, posters, and books. He published 24 books on the subject of photography.

“When words become unclear, I shall focus with photographs. When images become inadequate, I shall be content with silence.”

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

The Kudu and the Baboon

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This may be an unusual pose of a Kudu bull (Tragelaphus stepsiceros). The antelope had been taking water from a puddle in a drying water pan and had sensed a noise or smell, much like its baboon companion. Initially this animal was identified as a Nyala, but on a second look the photographer actually believes it is a kudu… they are related and they may look similar occasionally, but there is no mistaking the difference between the foreneck hair markings of each animal. This animal is very distictly kudu!
(Canon 50D; f/10; 1/800sec; ISO-800; 400mm)

Picture ©2013 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Wildlife Photographic Tips
Faster shutter speeds are essential for sharp images of animals on the move. While always giving consideration to lens’ focal distances when selecting your shutter speed, any action shot will require increased shutter speeds to freeze the action and give a sharp image. The closer the subject is to the lens, the faster it moves across your field of vision, thus the quicker the shutter speed should be. Think in terms of 1/1,500th sec and faster. Watch your exposure – adjust ISO if you reach the limits. Flip over to shutter priority when there is going to be action.