Kudu on Termite Mound

Kudu on Anthill_2016_10_15_3267A Kudu antelope cow (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) standing atop an termite mound is quite a common observation in Mana Pools. There is little reference as to why this antelope is attracted to these raised elevations and one can only guess this is either anti-predatory or the mount is a source of minerals and salts.
Population Trend : Stable; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mark III/ EF100-400 IS USM; 1/350 sec; f/5.6; ISO 1000; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Photography Terms
White Balance is sets the colour temperature of the scene being taken so that it takes on a normal appearance to the human eye. White balance can be adjusted to warm and cool images, and is often done post-shooting with editing software. Colour temperature is expressed in Kelvins

“Black and white can show how something is. Colour adds how it is, imbued with temperatures and humidities of experience.”

– Peter Schjeldahl

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

 

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Kudu Crypsis

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Kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros), one of the most graceful large antelopes in the Mana Pools area, pauses in the shade of a mahogany tree. This animal often relies on crypsis (a synonym for animal camouflage and anti-predator behaviour, such as stillness) allowing close approach by the threat. Once in flight, those magnificent horns are tucked along the back of the antelope through head held high.
Population Trend : Stable; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 50D/ EF-S18-200mm; 1/1500 sec; f/6.7; ISO 1250; 400mm)

Picture ©2011 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Photography Terms
Lighting ratio is a measure of the difference between key light and fill light. Key light is the main source of light which casts shadows versus fill light which is the light that fills in the shadow areas. The higher the lighting ratio, the greater the contrast. Although this may be manipulate with f-stop adjustment, a more effective or practical adjustment can be achieved in post photo processing.

“When I was just starting out, I met Cartier-Bresson. He told me it was necessary to trust my instincts, be inside my work, and set aside my ego. In the end, my photography turned out very different to his, but I believe we were coming from the same place.”

– Sebastiao Salgado

Grazing Kigelia Flowers

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A favourite delicacy of most southern African antelope, a lot of primates and elephants too, are the beautiful flowers of the sausage tree (Kigelia africana) which occurs throughout tropical Africa. Here a Kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) grazes on the flowers which have fallen from the tree. Often there is a symbiotic relationship between primates shaking branches and dislodging flowers in the tree and the animals which graze these flowers off the ground.
Population Trend : Stable; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM +1.4x III; 1/500 sec; f/4.5; ISO 640; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

The World of Lenses
Zoom Lenses, sometimes known as parfocal lenses where they retain focus through the focal range, are probably the most popularly used lenses, being especially prevalent among wildlife photographers. These lenses allow the user to adjust the focal length on the subject, while the image remains in focus (a zoom lens which loses focus during change to the focal length is varifocal). Zoom lenses suffer a loss of image resolution at maximum aperture, mainly at the extremes of their focal ranges.

“Here’s how you can tell if your ‘zoom’ is actually a varifocal. Zoom to maximum focal length and focus on an object manually about 10 feet away. Now zoom back to the shortest focal length. If the viewfinder is still sharp, you have a true zoom. If it’s hopelessly out of focus, it’s a varifocal.”

– Herbert Keppler

Simply Kudu

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There is just something about the Kudu (Tragelaphus stepsiceros) which everyone seems to warm to, especially when captured in the fine setting of the forest area in Mana Pools during the early morning light. These antelope were particularly alert to their surrounds as a pride of lions passed through the area. The kudu is a gregarious herder and non-territorial, typically comprising two to three cows with their young. They normally mate towards the end of the rains and have a gestation period of 9 months. The bulls normally shift away from cow groups during the rainy season which seems to coincide with the nursery period.
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III / EF100-400mm IS MkII USM; 1/200 sec; f/5.6; ISO 320; 400mm)

Picture ©2015 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Photography Quotes

Chelsea Roberson is an American photojournalist weaned on a “The Bison”, a publication belonging to the liberal arts university, Harding based in Searcy, Arkansas. She lives and breathes photography and is presently based in Southern California. Chelsea is attributed with this interesting quote:

“There’s no rhyme or reason to what makes a great photo. Most of the time it is pure chance and a quick shutter finger, but other times it is planning, ingenuity and sometimes even stalking”

Digger

Digger_2012_09_02_5493

The Kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) seems to be lying on its head, in a mock hang-over, while the baboon walks away in disgust. The antelope is digging with its horns into the soft surround to a nearly dried pan. It is not clear whether the Kudu was digging for water, probably to avoid having to walk over the semi dried soft surface and submerging dangerously in the mud, or whether it was bringing salts to the surface. One of the agnostic behaviours of Tragelaphus is ground horning following lateral presentation by two competing male. Horns are only present in the male of the species.
(Canon EOS 7D/EF70-200mm f/2.8-5.6L IS USM +1.4x ; 1/250 sec; f/8; ISO 200; 560mm)

Picture ©2012 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Photography Quotes Ted Grant is an award winning, leading Canadian photographer and photo journalist whose career extended 60 years for Canada’s leading newspapers and magazines. He has published 8 books. He was conferred with an Honorary Doctorate of Laws Degree, by the University of Victoria, in recognition of his outstanding career.

“When you photograph people in color, you photograph their clothes. But when you photograph people in Black and white, you photograph their souls! “

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting. Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…