Stretching in the Larder

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A bull elephant honing its food collection skills, which is a common sight in Mana Pools. That tree, Acacia Galpinii (also known as Monkey Thorn), which grows in riverine woodlands, is a favourite for pachyderms in the park. Those apparently sweet leaves will be bursting out in abundance during the spring, the tree will flower and six months later the pods will fall, another favourite delicacy of the elephant. This particular elephant actually lifts itself onto its hind legs and stretches higher into the tree for food. His skills are renowned, not only to photographers, but to the many other elephants which follow him on his feeding route.
(Canon EOS 5D MarkIII / EF 100-400mm f/4.5 L IS II USM; 1/2000 sec; f/5.6; ISO 1250; 170mm)

Picture ©2018 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

 

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.

Elephants in the Sunset

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Mother and child elephant (Loxodonta africana) make their way through a Mana Pools Faidehebia albida forest at sunset. What more could a photographer wish for.
Population Trend : Stable; Threat: VulnerableSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mark III/ EF100-400 IS USM; 1/350 sec; f/5.6; ISO 1000; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Photography Terms
Vignetting the shading of the corners of an image, deliberately for creative impact, or unintentionally through use of the wrong equipment, which is common with wide angle lenses.

“It is light that reveals, light that obscures, light that communicates. It is light I “listen” to. The light late in the day has a distinct quality, as it fades toward the darkness of evening. After sunset there is a gentle leaving of the light, the air begins to still, and a quiet descends. I see magic in the quiet light of dusk. I feel quite, yet intense energy in the natural elements of our habitat. A sense of magic prevails. A sense of mystery. It is a time for contemplation, for listening – a time for making photographs. ”

– John Sexton

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Hippos in a Pod

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Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius – Shona: Mvuu; Ndebele: Mvubu), often regarded as the most dangerous animal in Africa, particularly if you get in its way. At Long Pool, in the Mana Pools area, one is blessed with many a photo opportunity during the last hours as the sun casts a warm light on these beasts in the water. It is that time when Hippo begin to stir, making ready for their long trek into the surrounding veldt to eat.
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/500 sec; f/5.6; ISO 320; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

A-Z of Photography

Clipping is the term referred to when the light intensity/dimness falls outside the maximum and minimum intensities that can be displayed in a digital image resulting in the loss of picture detail in the clipped area. This most commonly occurs in camera with over or under exposure. Bright or white areas of the image are usually referred to as being blown-out It is possible for a single colour channel to be clipped (out-of-gamut clipping) giving rise to an apparent discolouration of the image, and this is normally consistent with post image capture processing.

“One can consider or define the over exposed and under exposed portraits as High Key and Low Key Portraits.”

– Lakshman Iyer

Elephant and Impala at Sunset

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Mana Pools at sunset experiences the most extraordinary change in light and photo opportunity, but the window is often small. Frequently, this is a time when one just lowers the camera, observes, and enjoys.
Population Trend : Increasing; Threat: VulnerableSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/350 sec; f/5.6; ISO 1000; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

A-Z of Photography
Hyperfocal Distance is the distance of the nearest object in a composition that is acceptably sharp when the lens is focused on infinity (or the distance). Focusing on objects at the hyperfocal distance ensures sharpness of the image from half way between the photographer and the hyperfocal point into infinity. As the aperture of the camera is closed or tightened (i.e. increasing the f/stop) the hyperfocal distance is reduced.

“A landscape image cuts across all political and national boundaries, it transcends the constraints of language and culture”

– Charlie Waite

Lone Impala Framed

Loan Impala Framed_2015_08_22_9399

An Impala (Aepyceros melampusShona: mhara; Ndebele: ipala ) ram, protecting his patch, is framed on the flood plain, with the haze saturating through the trees, giving off a misty aura, in the beauty of an early Mana Pools morning. It does not get better.
(Canon EOS 5D Mark III / EF100-400mm IS II USM +1.4x III; 1/160 sec; f/9; ISO 640; 560mm)

Picture ©2015 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

A-Z of Photography

Zoom lenses, also known as parfocal lenses, maintain focus when the focal length is changed, giving rise to the term zoom-creep in some lenses when the lens is pointed up or downwards (overcome by some manufacturers with zoom ring resistance adjustments). Some lenses are varifocal, losing focus during zooming, so zoom creep can be a serious annoyance. Zoom lenses suffer loss of image resolution at the extremes of their focal length.

“One glibly despises the photographer who zooms in on the starving child or the dying soldier without offering help. Writing is not different.”

– Alan Bennett – 2006

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…