Crocodile Basking

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The crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus), ever present in the Zambezi River, a menace to man, taking some 200 people a year throughout Africa it is believed. They survive substantially on fish, but will often attack unsuspecting mammals taking water at the river’s edge. Often this reptile will submerge its prey and allow it to decay before consuming the meat. Its round, pointed teeth are not conducive to chewing and, habitually, crocodiles may be found spinning in the water to release chunks of meat from its prey to be swallowed whole.
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/350 sec; f/13; ISO 320; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

A-Z of Photography
Macro-photography produces photographs of small items larger than life size, using lenses with extreme close-up focal points, producing a life size or larger image of the subject on a sensor or film plane. Projection of an image, being life size, onto a sensor is at a 1:1 magnification. Anything larger than 1:10 magnification is not really macro. Macro functionality may be achieved through the use of macro lenses, extension tubes, of macro filters, which enable close-up work.

“The transformative photographer embarks upon an intuitive, insightful path which opens into an innate understanding of how marvellously grand everything is… whether small or big, micro- or macrocosmic, minute or immense… it is all blow-your-mind incredible, in the sense that the ‘all of it’ is simply awesome.”

– Simhananda

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Flood Plain Elephants

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Occasionally, the photographer is presented with the perfect opportunity, the golden hour, well lit subject with an amazingly unobtrusive background. How could anyone help but not take this shot. These elephants (Loxodonta africana) were grazing on a sand bank in the Zambezi River, their purpose was not so much for food, but more for the salts or minerals (more specifically sodium), apparently deficient in their diet or, according to some, roughage to assist digestion found in consumption of the sandy lome. Some call this geophagy, which more rightly belongs to clay consumption. The trait is more common in female elephants, following fecal-sodium loss in pregnancy and lactation.
(Canon EOS 5D Mark III/EF70-200mm IS USM + 1.4x; 1/400 sec; f/6,3; ISO 200; 280mm)

Picture ©2014 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Photography Quotes
Robert Capa was a Hungarian war photographer, and photojournalist who covered many wars including the Spanish Civil War, the Second Sino-Japanese War, World War II across Europe, the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, and the First Indochina War. Capa is attributed with the quote:

“If your pictures aren’t good enough, you aren’t close enough”

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Greenbul in a Bush

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One little occupant of the Mana Pools area was this African Yellow-bellied Bulbul (Chlorocichla flaviventris), now referred to as a Yellow Bellied Greenbul, who is a frequent visitor to the Goliath Safaris lunch table. This bird and a few others have become very tame in the process. Its general habitat is that of riverine forests, thorn veld and coastal shrub. It occurs fairly common along the banks of the Zambezi River. They co-habit in flights of five or six birds and eat insects, not to mention bread scraps at the safari camp.
(Canon EOS 7D/EF100-400mm IS USM ; 1/350 sec; f/5.6; ISO 800; 310mm)

Picture ©2014 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Photography Quotes
We are changing the theme a little and for the next year I would like to quote some of the more famous photographers. We start with the inspirational Henri Cartier-Bresson, the French father of photo-journalism, who many suggest was the greatest photographer of all time. He became famous for his candid photography and was the master of street photography.

“To photograph is to hold one’s breath, when all faculties converge to capture fleeting reality. It’s at that precise moment that mastering an image becomes a great physical and intellectual joy.”

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

The Elusive Verreaux’s Eagle Owl

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The Verreaux’s Eagle-Owl (Bubo lacteus), a seldom-encountered bird, caught early one morning basking in the sun in Mopani forest near the Zambezi River. The owl is distinguishable by its black face border and the pink eyelids. This nocturnal, avian apex predator is found in much of Southern Africa, with possibly the exception of southern Namibia and the thick rain forest areas. It has a preference for drier savannah and semi desert habitats. Verreaux’s owls feed mostly on small mammals including young monkeys, ground squirrels, rats and mice. They breed as monogamous pairs and occupy stick constructed nests of other birds.
(Canon EOS 7D; f/4; 1/2000sec; ISO-500; 280mm)

Picture ©2013 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Wildlife Photographic Tips
Wildlife photographers are often faced with image opportunities that have very bright and dark areas in the frame and they need to consider whether to over or under expose to catch the more important highlights of the shot. In assessing this, one needs to understand that darker tones have more image noise while at the other end of the scale the more brighter tones cannot be recorded (or are clipped i.e. are pure white and give the impression of burn out). Choose to under or over compensate your exposure. It is most important to check image histograms, adjust and take again, if you have time.

Valley Sunset with Elephants

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One of the most marvelous experiences one can have. A sunset on the Zambezi River flood plain with elephants. Peace on earth personified.
(Canon 50D; f/10; 1/60sec; ISO-640; 70mm)

Picture ©2011 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Wildlife Photographic Tips
When using a tripod, avoid extending the tripod’s centre post. Rather extend the legs of the tripod before you do. This will lend to greater stability of the camera on the tripod. Where you are using a larger lens, use the lens’ L-bracket to secure the camera/lens combination to the tripod rather than just the camera’s tripod connector. This will also provide more stability. Where possible use a cable release too!