Penis Swinging

Charging Bull_2014_10_04_3783

Most bull elephants (Loxodonta africana) in the Mana Pools National Park are gentlemen, with a few notable exceptions, but not this one! This beast evidently got out of bed the wrong side and came at the photographer like a steam train with its penis swinging in the wind. Fortunately a mock charge, but one can never be sure, if you do not know the elephant concerned. We did not know this one. These bull elephants seem have great ego and want to show who is boss on their turf. We got the message.
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM ; 1/400 sec; f/4; ISO 400; 150mm)

Picture ©2014 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Photography Quotes
Advertising and documentary photographer, Elliot Erwitt, is better known for his monochrome candid photography and a master of capturing the absurd and the ironic on film. He learned much of his craft in the United States Army and authored four books on photography.

“Nothing happens when you sit at home. I always make it a point to carry a camera with me at all times. I just shoot at what interests me at that moment.”

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Buffalo Sentinels at Dusk

Sentinal Buffalo_2013_10_02_1007_768x512px

Buffalo (Syncerus caffer) sentinels caught on camera during last light in the Mana Pools National Park. This herd, estimated at between 200-250 animals was on the move towards the nearby, denser jessie before nightfall. Buffalo often traverse the parks between watering and grazing points. Their large herds move in column formations generally with bachelor bulls surrounding them and acting as sentinels. Matriarch cows tend to follow pathfinder buffaloes at the head of the column and also have a presence at the rear with the ‘stragglers’ where predators concentrate their efforts and are least likely to suffer mobbing.
(Canon 7D; f/3.5; 1/350sec; ISO-800; 200mm)

Picture ©2013 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Wildlife Photographic Tips
Moving in close to wildlife may well be the difference between a splendid image or failure. Sometimes, this means physically moving towards your subject. The photographer should respect the comfort or safety zone of the subject, and should be sure not to encroach on that of dangerous wildlife without professional guidance. Know your field-craft and signs or signals given by wildlife. These animals are unpredictable and more defensive in the presence of their young.

Please be encouraged to click on the “No Comments” or “Comments” link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 star… this feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Martial Eagle Juvenile

Martial Eagle_2013_06_04_9485_512x768px

This was the first time that I have spotted a Martial Eagle (Polemaetus bellicosus), in this case a juvenile, in the Mana Pools National Park. This bird of prey may be found in most of southern Africa. It is mainly a savannah species, although some suggest is more common in mountainous areas, but in fact may be found in all habitats, including desert and forest areas. This image, in a typical pose atop a dead tree, shows from where, generally, this bird swoops down on its prey; mostly small mammals and game birds.
(Canon 7D; f/11; 1/750sec; ISO-320; 400mm)

Picture ©2013 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Wildlife Photographic Tips
The most successful time to dabble in wildlife image capture is during the earliest and last hours of the day, commonly known as the golden hours. The earliest and very latest minutes of this range of light present challenges which can be met with that little adjustment of ISO for higher ‘gain’. There is conflict, for example, between your slowest exposure levels and capturing a moving animal, say at a predator kill, where it is sacrilege to use your flash!

Please be encouraged to click on the “No Comments” or “Comments” link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 star… this feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Lion Cubs Looking for Mother

Two lion cubs (Panthera leo) in Mana Pools National Park, Zimbabwe, seek their mother. She was nearby watching the male of the pride licking the final morsels of meat off a slain warthog with no care in the world about sharing with the rest of the pride.
(Canon 7D; f/8; 1/90sec; ISO-500; 560mm)

Picture ©2012 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Squirrel Sunbathing

The tree squirrel (Paraxerus cepapi cepapi) is a common inhabitant of the Mana Pools National Park. Generally an herbivore feeding on leaves, roots and berries, it is known to take the occasional insect, when opportunity presents. This little fellow is on the orgy list, since attempts by females at mating will trigger oestrus cycles in others in the area, prolific mating and eventually, synchronized births, an amazing quirk of nature. They raise their young in family groups only ousting the young when they become sexually mature. Their worst enemies are arboreal snakes, especially the Boomslang and Black Mamba.
(Canon 7D; f/6.7; 1/750sec; ISO-320; 400mm)

Picture ©2012 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography