Down we Go!

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Baboons (Papio cynocephalus) when safely ensconced up a tree always seem to take flight and desert the tree when even slightly threatened during the day. More commonly than not they reverse down the trunk as fast as they can! It usually happens so fast, that the cameraman needs to be quick to action. At night time baboons, typically, do not budge and remain hidden away aloft the tree.
Population Trend : Stable; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/180 sec; f/6.7; ISO 320; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Photography Terms
Gaussian Blur is the result of a digital adjustment using graphics software which effects the blurring of a part or the entire image. With some skill, it may emulate the effect of depth of field achieved through aperture adjustment in camera, but its use more generally is to reduce noise and detail in the image. The difference between Gaussian blur and bokeh is in the creation. One is created optically and the other is post-production adjustment. Bokeh is three dimensional and less smooth.

“Here, then, was a paradox of picture taking that appeared from the start. Despite its promise of the ultimate document, of a picture more realistic than art could achieve, the camera was also an instrument of artifice and posing, even fakery and deceit. The invention that enabled people to write with the sun would blur the distinction between appearance and reality, between the image and the event.”

– Kiku Adatto

Waterbuck Flight

waterbuck-flight_2016_10_15_3101Being among the rich wildlife of Mana Pools is ever rewarding. Just something simple, like Waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus) in flight, with their shaggy coats, often presents an opportunity. These three Waterbuck seem to have been spooked by something, which was never identified. They are not very fast on the hoof, in fact some describe them as donkey like. They are no match for the more common predators of Mana Pools, such as Wild Dog and Lions.
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/1500 sec; f/5.6; ISO 320; 340mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

A-Z of Photography

Depth of Field is the zone of acceptable sharpness in an image controlled by the aperture of the camera and being dependent upon focal length and focusing distance. The tighter the lens aperture the longer the depth of field in an image. Aperture is measured in f/stops and the lower the f/stop the less the depth of field.

“What uses having a great depth of field, if there is not an adequate depth of feeling? ”

– W. Eugene Smith

Buffalo Signs

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A number of buffaloes (Syncerus caffer) stop and look back at the photographer, perhaps an indication for the intruder not to venture any closer. The lead animal here seems to be smelling the air although the posture is typically agonistic of buffalo.
(Canon EOS 5D Mark III /EF200-400mm IS II USM EXT; 1/640 sec; f/13; ISO 1250; 560mm)

Picture ©2014 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Hang a Little Africa on your Wall
This image and others on this site may be purchased in printed form on canvas or photographic paper. Contact the author.

Digital Wildlife Photographic Tips

The further away the subject, the greater is the depth of field. When using the largest aperture available and image shot 1m away will have a narrow 1cm depth of field… at 25m the depth of field increased to 11m – you should get to know the broader depth of field parameters of the lenses you use.

Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Two Fish Eagles

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An opportunity shot of two Fish Eagles (Haliaeetus vocifer) that we all know so well and found so typically in pairs in tall trees near water. As their name implies, these eagles subsist mainly on fish, mostly dead or stranded, but they do stoop and take fish near the surface with their talons, sometimes submerging themselves in the process. They also prey on small birds and mammals. Their amazing call is perhaps best known of all the birds in southern Africa. These predators are generally well distributed through that region.
(Canon EOS 5D Mark III /EF200-400mm IS II USM EXT; 1/400 sec; f/7.1; ISO 320; 420mm)

Picture ©2011 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Hang a Little Africa on your Wall
This image and others on this site may be purchased in printed form on canvas or photographic paper. Contact the author.

Digital Wildlife Photographic Tips

When using a zoom lens, the user will notice that the longer the focal length the less the depth of field is apparent. The priority will be to get the subject within the depth of field range for sharpness, but watch the background. Background clutter close to the subject may not be thrown entirely out of focus and thus becomes a distraction. The further the background is from the subject, the greater the blur effect.

Please be encouraged to click on the ‘Comments’ link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 stars. This feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…

Elephants at the Pond

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What more can one say about this marvellous view of elephants (Loxodonta africana) enjoying a drink in the middle of the day. Wait patiently by a good water pan anywhere in southern Africa and you are likely to encounter these graceful beasts. What beholds the greater beauty: this or an ivory trinket sitting on your mantle-piece? It is a no brainer really. Interestingly, it is considered that elephants have more environmental impact that any other mammal besides man. They are renowned for their destruction of trees; the very source of their long term food supply, which in the past has resulted in ghastly ‘culling’ of this adorable beast.
(Canon EOS 7D; f/5.6; 1/750sec; ISO-320; 140mm)

Picture ©2013 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Wildlife Photographic Tips
There is a view that great nature photography composition should be kept as simple as possible and the subject of the image be well placed in the frame and be without other image ‘clutter’ detracting from the subject. Clearly, this is where a narrow depth of field will come into play. The bush is full of distracting clutter and it is difficult to change your viewing-point in a wildlife environment, so use a wider f-stop to blur out unwanted clutter. More importantly take several shots at different f-stops. Recompose frequently.

Please be encouraged to click on the “No Comments” or “Comments” link below and rate the photograph 1 to 5 star… this feedback is invaluable to the photographer. If you are feeling awfully kind you could Tweet it or share the link too!

Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…