Down we Go!

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Baboons (Papio cynocephalus) when safely ensconced up a tree always seem to take flight and desert the tree when even slightly threatened during the day. More commonly than not they reverse down the trunk as fast as they can! It usually happens so fast, that the cameraman needs to be quick to action. At night time baboons, typically, do not budge and remain hidden away aloft the tree.
Population Trend : Stable; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/180 sec; f/6.7; ISO 320; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Photography Terms
Gaussian Blur is the result of a digital adjustment using graphics software which effects the blurring of a part or the entire image. With some skill, it may emulate the effect of depth of field achieved through aperture adjustment in camera, but its use more generally is to reduce noise and detail in the image. The difference between Gaussian blur and bokeh is in the creation. One is created optically and the other is post-production adjustment. Bokeh is three dimensional and less smooth.

“Here, then, was a paradox of picture taking that appeared from the start. Despite its promise of the ultimate document, of a picture more realistic than art could achieve, the camera was also an instrument of artifice and posing, even fakery and deceit. The invention that enabled people to write with the sun would blur the distinction between appearance and reality, between the image and the event.”

– Kiku Adatto

The Godfather

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The adult baboon (Papio cynocephalus) in this image is not necessarily the father, but may well be a ‘godfather’ who has been associated with the mother of the youngster in some way. The loving hug by this male demonstrates a trait among baboon troops of godfathering which includes holding, grooming and food sharing. This is a very unique social bonding and normally lasts for near on two years, when the juvenile becomes more independent of its maternal ties. Godfathering baboons are known to foster the orphaned young.
Population Trend : Stable; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/350 sec; f/5.6; ISO 640; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Photography Terms
Exposure latitude is the extent to which any light-sensitive material can tolerate under or over exposure and still produce an acceptable image. This is put to use by the photographer in such a way as to give aesthetic and artistic value to an image, but is purely subjective. Media has some impact on exposure latitude, black and white film, for example, is far less tolerant than say colour film. This measure should not be confused with dynamic range, which is the cameras ability to ‘see’ from the darkest shadow to the brightest highlight.

“A snapshot steals life that it cannot return. A long exposure creates a form that never existed.”

– Dieter Appelt

Simian Jockey

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You just have to love baboons (Papio Cynocephalus), they are often the source of great entertainment in the bush. Here a commonly adopted form of transportation of the young, which any jockey would be proud to achieve! Small baboons gain locomotion skills after about a month after birth, including climbing. By 6-12 weeks they are able to ride on the backs of adults ‘jockey’ style. At speed, amazingly, they can stay mounted.
Population Trend : Stable; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/2000 sec; f/5.6; ISO 640; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Photography Terms
Diopter adjustments come with most high end cameras and allow camera users to calibrate the view finder to match their eyesight. The same calibration may be found on microscopes. A diopter is a unit of measure, which may be associated with close-up lens to indicate magnification, but more commonly it is the adjustment to the view finder. This adjustment allows the user to view the image in the viewfinder without the use of glasses.

“The geography of a person’s face can be very interesting, but a close-up will not tell us who the person is, how they think or live, or the situation they’re in”

– Peter Adams

Good Morning Africa

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This is contre jour in Africa, a genre in photography involving the back lighting of a subject. The early morning is a special time to absorb the warmth of the African sun and to take photographs of our fur clad friends, the baboons (Papio cynocephalus), enjoying that warmth. Here, a troop is sitting absorbing the first rays, pondering the new day and basking in the warmth. No newspapers, no mobile phones, and no rush hour traffic here!
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF70-200mm IS II USM; 1/1500 sec; f/6.3; ISO 640; 400mm)

Picture ©2015 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography 🐾

A-Z of Photography
Quasi-fish-eye-lenses (sometimes called full framed fish-eye) are lens which produce an image on either film or sensor the covers the entire area of the frame. A true fish-eye-lens will normally produce a circular (or hemispherical) image covering and ultra-wide angle of view (180º – 8mm).

“A very fine photographer asked me, ‘What did it feel like the first time you manipulated an image?’, and I said ‘Do you mean the first time I shot black and white instead of colour, do you mean the first time I burned the corner of a print down, do you mean the first time I spotted a dust speck on my print, do you mean the first time I shot with a wide angle instead of a normal lens, I mean what are you referring to? Where does it stop?'”

– Dan Burkholder

Solitary Moments

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Happiness is sometimes a few solitary moments, mid-morning, basking in the sun. This small baboon (Papio cynocephalus ursinus), seated atop a white ant mount up against a sturdy tree, seems to have enjoyed the moments before being disturbed. The baboon is normally a gregarious little beast.
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/80 sec; f/10; ISO 320; 400mm)

Picture ©2015 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

A-Z of Photography
White Balance is achieved through a process in which a digital camera analyses the scene to determine unrealistic colour casts in the frame, using pure whites in the scene as a reference. This process ensures pure whites and other colours are recorded correctly by calibration of colour balances in an attempt to record colour accurately. The photographer can set the white balance to suit the colour temperature falling on the subject. Most cameras have auto white balances, but they are not fool proof, sometimes leaving a colour cast.

“What do I truly hate about DSLRs? Menus! Particularly menus that I need to consult for ISO settings and/or white balance. Buttons marked ISO and WB with direct access do me fine.”

– – Herbert Keppler – 2007

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
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Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…