Lookout Duty

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Lookout Duty
Baboons are always difficult to get close to, especially when they have one on watch duty. Clearly this one was absorbed by something he is nibbling on, or being safely ensconced there was no threat. Doubtful, baboons are quick to take flight even if the threat is sitting at the base of the tree.
(Canon EOS 5D MarkIII / EF 100-400mm f/5.6 L IS II USM +1.4X III; 1/1000 sec; f/8; ISO 320; 560mm)

Picture ©2018 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Breakfast with a Baboon

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Two species which are often found together are the baboon (Papio cynocephalus) and the impala antelope (Aepyceros melampusShona: mhara; Ndebele: ipala ). Here the young male impala appears to be in community with the baboon over breakfast. Some suggest a symbiotic relationship between these two animals. Impala have been observed to be more ‘approachable’ in the presence of a baboon troop, perhaps providing a false sense of security, and such troops will often sound the alarm when predators are present (basically an early warning system for the impala). Some have observed that grazing impala often unearth grubs and insects which baboons will feed on. A strange relationship, since it is not unknown for baboons to grab young impala calves, mutilate and eat them.
(Canon 7D; f/6.3; 1/250sec; ISO-200; 400mm)

Picture ©2012 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

 

Contemplation

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Chacma baboon (Papio cynocephalus ursinus) contemplates life at the side of a pool. Baboons are probably the most common species, aside from the impala antelope, in the majority of parks in southern Africa. In fact baboons tend to follow the more populous impala, often feeding off their droppings, and are known to kill (not very efficiently) and eat juvenile impala when opportunity presents itself. Socially, baboons are not unlike politicians, operating in an oligarchic community where males groom and pander more dominant females to garner support for elevation in the troop, almost to the extent of pair-bonding. Females in oestrus tend towards being promiscuous, allowing sub-adults and sometimes even juveniles to mount them and, apparently, older males are a little more discerning about with whom they copulate.
(Canon 7D; f/5,6; 1/50sec; ISO-320; 400mm)

Picture ©2011 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Uber Mana

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Baboon taxi service in Mana.
(Canon EOS 5D MarkIII / EF 100-400mm f/2.8L IS II USM; 1/320 sec; f/8.0; ISO 640; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas or photographic paper for wall mounting.

Mother’s Little Helper

Baby Baboon_2016_10_15_3071Baboon (Papio cynocephalus) mothers are extremely protective of their young in their complex social organisation. Offspring are ranked according to age within a kinship group, the youngest being of most importance.
Population Trend : Stable; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D Mk III/ EF100-400mm IS II USM; 1/180 sec; f/6.7; ISO 320; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.
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Stuck in darkest Africa, lost in the wild and loving it! Don’t let me out of here…