Fodder on the Trotter

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The Warthog is a particularly camera shy little beast, often caught dashing across the veld with tail rigidly upright, rather like a car aerial. Those tusks are actually enlarged canine teeth and a nasty defensive weapon. This member of the pig family is well targeted, for a snack, by all the known predators. Warthogs have calloused pads on their wrists from grazing on bent forelegs.
(Canon EOS 5D MarkIII / EF 100-400mm f/5.6 L IS II USM; 1/2000 sec; f/4.5; ISO 320; 100mm)

Picture ©2018 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

 

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.

Dusty Squabbles

Just imaging waking up before first light and then enjoying the dawn with our zebra friends as the sun, filtered by think bush, pops over the distant horizon. These two zebras where enjoying a friendly joust, and, yes, they did rise up on their hind legs presenting an incredible opportunity, but photographer never got the shot.
(Canon EOS 5D MarkIII / EF 100-400mm f/5.6 L IS II USM +1.4xIII; 1/750 sec; f/10; ISO 2000; 560mm)

Picture ©2018 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.

Lone Eland

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This lone Eland seems to be contemplating the night ahead, when spotted at last light. There is an odd growth or some critter on the eland’s back… cannot determine exactly what it is.  Little bit of a challenging shot.
(Canon EOS 5D MarkIII / EF 100-400mm f/2.8L IS II USM; 1/180 sec; f/5.6; ISO 1000; 400mm)

Picture ©2016 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

 

This image, and others of your selection, can be acquired from the author printed on fine art canvas of photographic paper for wall mounting.

Waterbuck Resting

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It’s a little unusual to see a Waterbuck (Kobus EllipsiprymnusShona: dhumukwa; Ndebele: isidumuka) lying down. This bull was happy to continue resting and poses well in front of an old termite mound overgrown with mop like shrub. Batchelor males normally group together, but this bull was alone. Separation of male offspring from the maternal herd takes place as soon as the horns begin to develop, often provoked by territorial males. Young males join bachelor herds where the grow to maturity.
Population Trend : Decreasing; Threat: Least ConcernSource IUCN
(Canon EOS 5D MarkIII / EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM +1.4III; 1/320 sec; f/5.0; ISO 640; 260mm)

Picture ©2015 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography

Digital Photography Terms
Golden Hour is a period of time after sunrise and before sunset in which wildlife and landscape photographers achieve amazing results due to the warmth of the light and reduced contrast. The cast of long shadows is a tell-tale sign of early morning or later afternoon photography. Landscape images reveal greater texture during the golden hour.

“A kind of golden hour one remembers for a life time… Everything was touched with magic.”

– Margaret Bourke-White

Male Impala Lock Horns

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Two male impala antelopes (Aepyceros melampusShona: mhara; Ndebele: ipala ) lock horns in a tussle during the lambing period, when most male impala spar with each other to move up the mating queue. It is a process of establishing a fighting category, which apparently determines mating precedence. Rank surely does have its privileges. This was a fleeting battle between the two giving an opportunity shot for split seconds before they each ‘bomb shelled’ in different directions. There was no knowing who won. Impala are the more prolific variety of antelope in southern African parks and a common source of protein for carnivores.
(Canon 50D; f/5,6; 1/250sec; ISO-100; 380mm)

Picture ©2010 Andrew Field – Simply Wild Photography